Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Sarawak Mulu caves

When I went to Mulu, I was treated like royalty. They danced for us.

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http://ourworldtuesdaymeme.blogspot.co.nz/

Mulu caves

When I went to Mulu, I was treated like royalty. They danced for us.

ABC letter G for Ginseng.

Ginseng Jawa (Talinum paniculatum gaertn.) surprised to see this in my friends garden in Auckland. Growing wild. They grew wild in my Singapore garden. I picked the flowers as cut flowers, but they drop off in a day. My aunty told me that it can be used as ginseng and the leaves are edible.

Friday, August 18, 2017

Flower Power

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 'In honour of @[100002531508875:2048:Nicolas Blackburn]'s Commonwealth school, my second blue flower.

Plumbago auriculata'
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'Linaria purpurea special purple flower I just photographed from the garden for my other niece.  J @[100001955643386:2048:Ah Ling]'
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When ever I watch on television or print copies of advertisements of ladies soaking in a tub of water with orchids floating on top of it in a spa, I remember my grand mother’s flower power treatment.

The year was 1975, my sister had her first baby, and my nephew wasn’t sucking well. She was suffering from a breast abscess. Grand Ma sent me around the neighborhood to scour for nine different kinds of flowers. They had to be of different hues as well.

It wasn’t easy looking for nine types of flowers and besides I thought she was old fashion and I felt rather stupid going up to people’s house asking for some of their flowers. We were also new to the neighbourhood.

“I need a handful of your mauve colored flowers.”

“Why do you want my flowers?”

“Because my sister has………. breast infection.”

As a teenager, it was rather embarrassing explaining that part of the anatomy. Fortunately, the neighbors were very kind and helpful, and some even helped me pluck the flowers.

After I filled my basketful of flowers of nine different hues I came home. Grand Ma put them in the long bath tub and ran hot water into the tub. Then she and my sister locked themselves in the bathroom. I stood outside the bathroom listening to:

“OW!!!! HOT!!!HOT!!!”

“It’s got to be hot, otherwise it won’t work.”

After that hot flower treatment, my sister got better. But I was skeptical about Grand Ma’s treatment.

I said,” May be she would have gone better, with or without the flowers.”

Fast forward some twenty five years, I was living with my three year old son who became a scary cat after he was frightened by the loud engine sound of my friend’s old Holden. It came to a stage that it was so bad that he refused to leave the apartment. We were imprisoned in our own home because the old Holden was parked downstairs of our apartment.

Come another old lady to the rescue. My girl friend’s mother told me to get nine types of flowers to bath him. I remember my late Grand Ma’s flower power treatment. I went gathering flowers.

It didn’t work for my son, he refused to get into the tub with flowers floating on it. It took a long time, and a lot of coaxing, D even dragged Sam to no avail and finally requesting my friend to remove the car. She was very accommodating. At last we were freed of the clutches of fear.

In Singapore and Bangkok, I often go and luxuriate in the health and beauty spas. The aestheticism and spa technicians sometimes run a tub filled with rose petals or orchid flowers. They tell me their sing song English that the flowers have extracts that will relieve me of stress and relief from insomnia I laughed, my Grand Ma knew about this long ago.

Back in Auckland, I go for Chinese massages. The Chinese doctor soaks my feet in tiny red flowers in a wooden tub before he massages my feet and the rest of the body. Oh!!! I feel so pampered.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

pretty tiny white flowers




beautiful ground cover with tiny white flowers.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

ABC letter F for flood.





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Borrowing my aunty Francisca Leong's photo. I have often written about the annual floods in Sibu. The flood water usually comes at night, and Mum and Dad would get us all up to push the car to a higher place. We would wade in the water back to the house.

The next few days, the flood water would come to our knees. That's a fun time for us, swimming and paddling in a man made raft that Dad made for us.

When the water recedes, it is not nice, vegetables, papaya trees die, and worst still, dead animals float away

Did I ever tell you I have a phobia of rats and mice? During the flood, the rodents come up to the raised edges of the vegetable beds. I associate the rats with the plague of London.


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http://abcwednesday.com

Monday, August 14, 2017

Freesias 2017








Freesia is a genus of about 14 species. Freesia bulbs are usually grown for use asCut Flowers. All the 14 species of Freesia are African in origin. Of The 14 Freesia species, 12 are native to Cape Province, South Africa, the remaining two to tropical Africa, with one these species extending north of the equator to Sudan. Freesia flowers are very fragrant, typically white or yellow, and are borne in spikelike racemes. This blooming beauty captures your heart and is a springtime favorite.

http://floralfridayfoto.blogspot.co.nz/

Freesia plants stem from bulbs, so they should be planted in at least groups of three in high-quality composted soil. Grow freesias directly in the ground or in containers.

Freesias grow in my garden and bloom in winter. The winter cold


Chinese surnames







Sunday, August 13, 2017

conflicting beliefs.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/buddhist-ceremonial-release-captive-birds-may-harm-wildlife/

A young Vietnamese woman’s husband fell ill. Desperate for a cure, she later recounted, she visited the local Buddhist temple. A monk there instructed her to “release 40 birds, one for every year of your husband’s life.” So she did, purchasing and releasing 40 birds at the temple grounds. The woman soon rejoiced; her husband made a full recovery.

I grew up in a Christian family in Sibu where many people were Christians. I did not know about Fong San, "release a life" until I went to Singapore. An Indian friend's husband, a colleague of my husband, Prof in NTU found a tortoise with red paint written on the underbelly of the tortoise. She did not know what it meant. A friend explained Fong San. She said this is a bad custom, Fong San in this case meant getting the tortoise to carry away the bad luck/sickness to the person who picks it up.
I have found out since other reasons, and in my latest book, I wrote about it.
Thanks Ritchie for writing about it. He uses the term 放生 (Fàngshēng) which is in Mandarin.
Religion aside, some people during weddings and funerals, release doves etc. Environmentally this is frown on.

 A reader commented:

The truth meaning of fangsheng is not releasing bad luck or sickness. It's releasing of a capture animal's life to harvest good karma.

 May be some people in Singapore have other thoughts.

that's their own interpretation. That's loads of bullshit.
There is another bullshit thing they practise. If for no reasons they treat/chia you for a free meal/makan, it is usually a person in that family is very sick. By treating people to dinner/makan, the makan people who help spread the bad luck away. Conversely, a rich properous person has a birthday, people come to eat and even DAPAU/takeaway. The idea is to take the good luck home.
As a writer of both fiction and non fiction. For ficttion,  I write for entertainment. Recently, a man bought a tortoise for his pet. His wife asked him if he had checked for any paint. He retorted, of course I had, you think I am stupid.
Buddhists across Asia release wildlife as a show of compassion, but conservationists find that the practice tortures the animals and may impact threatened species.
 

New Zealand Chinese in Historical images by Phoebe Li


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 Helen Wong, NZ Historian and researcher with Phoebe Li.

Had the privilege to meet Phoebe Li , Post Doc of Tsinghua University during the Auckland Family Expo. The New Zealand Chinese Association was promoting the above book.
She is currently working on the history of the Chinese in Australia through a media studies approach.

The Chan family came to NZ, we have two lawyers, a forester, 2 PhDs and a writer married to a PhD.

Huckleberry Finn


https://www.facebook.com/ruth.sibat/videos/vb.1449381876/10213318728469926/?type=2&theater&notif_t=comment_mention&notif_id=1502433077018786

Do you believe in Vibes? My friend from Methodist school talked about Mark Twain. I thought of Tom Sawyer painting the fence. My Friend Ruth posts a video of a raft. Ruth's bro Joseph was my classmate. The raft reminds me of Huckleberry Finn. I had to borrow the video.

Then we traced back to 1967, and found our teacher who taught us English.

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Family History Expo



http://rubytuesdaytoo.blogspot.co.nz/

I was exhibiting at the Auckland Family History Expo, and this lovely lady wore her red costume.

The Auckland Research Centres are able to provide the tools and resources to help you on your family history journey. Whether you are just starting out or are wanting to explore something new, find out what we have to offer here:
http://www.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/EN/heritage/familyhistory/Pages/familyhistory.aspx



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Friday, August 11, 2017

Diary of a bereaved Mother.





Tomorrow I will be exhibiting and selling my books at the http://aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/…/P…/familyhistoryexpo.aspx. As I get ready, I feel so blessed especially with my first book. I had a marvelous write-up by the Aucklander, an exhibition in England, an interview in TVNZ, Downunder, Sarawak Radio. and circulated by international libraries and a reference book in a university of Canada.

 Always grateful to the first newspaper write-up .

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/aucklander/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503372&objectid=11030495

The New Zealand Herald is a daily newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand, owned by APN News & Media. It has the largest newspaper circulation of any in the country, peaking at over 200,000 copies in 2006, although numbers had declined to 162,181 by December 2012.[1] Its main circulation area is the Auckland region. It is also delivered to much of the north of the North Island including Northland, Waikato and King Country.[

Words of healing

 
A mother's account of the death of her newborn son has been turned into a book in the hope it will help other mothers heal. Rebecca Blithe meets the author. "The specialist said, 'You're going to have a normal baby'," says Ann Chin, as she sits with a pile of her recently published book, Diary of a Bereaved Mother.
But the days that followed the birth of her son, Andrew, proved anything but normal.
"Once I had my baby they realised he was dying," she says, of his diagnosis of Campomelic syndrome; a bone and cartilage condition resulting in short limbs and breathing problems because of a small chest capacity.
"They knew because of the scans, but they didn't investigate because it was a rare thing," she says, of the abnormalities. "When the baby was born, they resuscitated him. He was going to die that night. He survived for 55 days.
"One afternoon I was told he had died. He stopped breathing, he turned black, he was dead for half of the afternoon. Then he began breathing again." Describing that afternoon, the author seems lost for words. "You can't really give words, except that it was heart-wrenching, I was in a black tunnel."
During this period, Mrs Chin stayed in the nurses' home at National Women's Hospital, awaiting her baby's death, and writing.
"It was not only a diary for myself but I was writing letters to family in Australia and Singapore. I kept carbon copies," she says, adding her father had made his six children write daily compositions from a young age.
Twenty-one years later, after meeting other women who lost children, she decided to revisit her ordeal, in the hope of helping mothers cope and those close to them understand.
"Six hundred babies a year die. That's more than the road toll. [Compared to the funding for road safety] there's just nothing provided for us."
Mrs Chin, who teaches English as a second language, says reliving the experience was difficult but cathartic.
"I took out all my old files. I read them and I cried. I sat at the computer and I cried. But after a while, I was okay. Then I finished the first draft on his anniversary."
She says the feedback so far has been positive, especially from those who have had similar experiences.
"One of the mothers [from a Stillborn and Newborn Death support group], she just cried. She said to have someone writing about it was really helpful. I've spoken to grandparents as well. People tell me, 'Now I understand'."
Her story also tells of her disappointment with some of the staff at the antenatal unit and the importance of cultural sensitivity. "We had two doctors who kept saying, 'This is his problem'," she says, of medical staff shifting the blame.
The book has been requested by one of Mrs Chin's doctors, who is now based at the University of Toronto, Canada, to assist with training and hospital management procedures.
Dr Simon Rowley is a consultant at Starship Children's Hospital who's been given a copy of the book.
"It is a good reminder to all health professionals that when our patients leave us, the story does not end for the parents. The detail is amazing, and every little thought and action seems to have been recorded as it happened, and then has been reflected upon.
"For parents undergoing similar experiences this book could be a great comfort. For health professionals, I would see it as essential reading."
Further reading
Diary of a Bereaved Mother is available at The Women's Bookstore, 105 Ponsonby Rd, or  email Ann Chin: annkschin@yahoo.com


http://www.nzherald.co.nz/aucklander/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503372&objectid=11030495

TV and YouTube Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZk9w-uywAs&lr=1&user=asiadownunder 

Hello Ann and Deborah,
We set up the Forever in my heart exhibition today.  It runs from tomorrow, 31 January, until Monday, 4 February.  Gratefully I had 8 people helping me. We are all a bit exhausted, but satisfied with the job done.
Here is a short video of what the gallery looks like.  
Thank you so much for your book and Deborah's drawings.  I have framed one of your poems, Empty Arms, and placed it next to your book.
May this pay tribute to your son, Andrew, and all the babies who are lost to us, but still remain in our hearts.
Judy

http://www.foreverinmyheartexhibition.com/
e-mail: foreverinmyheartexhition@yahoo.co.uk
Just Giving: http://www.justgiving.com/Forever-in-my-heart
Facebook: www.facebook.com/foreverinmyheartexhibition 
Mobile: 07904955395




I encourage newly bereaved to draw or write their 

emotions. In  my book, I had a chapter on how to help 

children grieve. This was how 4 1/2 years old  Deborah 

grieved while waiting her brother die.

Forever In My Heart exhibition which is at the Peacock Art Gallery, Upton Country Park, from 31 January to 4 February 2013.


Judy Lancaster-Bowen


Hello Ann and Deborah,
The Forever in my Heart exhibition is this week and your book and Deborah's drawings really look so lovely. Thank you so much for including them in the exhibition. Many people, especially, stop for quite a while and look and comment on Deborah's drawings. Really spending the time looking at her Chinese Baby, Andrew, and your family picture. It does touch my heart each time I see someone standing in front of her drawings, and that even though it has been a long time since Andrew passed, you are still able to communicate what was going on for your family when Andrew was going to be "an angel".
Here is a link to the website where I have uploaded photographs from the exhibition.http://www.foreverinmyheartexhibition.com/134494020
You can also see more photographs on our facebook page:www.facebook.com/foreverinmyheartexhibition
Thank you so much
Judy



Thursday, August 10, 2017

Tom Sawyer and fence




Do you have incidences or chapters in books that you remember?
I don't know about you, but I do.
Tom Sawyer's whitewashing the fence by Mark Twain is something I always remember how Tom tricked his friends Huckleberry Finn and others (boys and girls) to paint his work for him by pretending it was a lot of fun. They had to "pay" him for this privilege. May be it is the constant reminder by all the fences around me. Perhaps it is the phrase: Build bridges, not fence that is deep inside the recess of my mind that has this impact.
I chanced upon this gentleman painting his fence that just jotted my memory. I studied this chapter when I was 12 and had just started my Secondary School in Methodist School in Sibu. I can't remember if it was chapter one. I never forgot. I can picture the teacher's face though I have forgotten his name.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Mary Anne Vaz , her story

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoHpX0-2jo0

http://www.thestar.com.my/story/?file=%2F2010%2F12%2F13%2Fsarawak%2F7562153&sec=sarawak
 http://www.thestar.com.my/story/Mary Annee Vaz%2Fsarawak%2F7562153&sec=sarawak
http://www.pustaka-sarawak.com/sarawakiana_gallery/authors.php?id=63
 http://www.pustaka-sarawak.com/sarawakiana_gallery/authors.php?id=63
I got to know Mary Anne Vaz recently through chatting  and googling. I did a couple of blogs and facebook postings because her philosophy is similar to mine. We both love doing charity and use our hands to help others. It is her art to bring awareness to the Penan people that single her out.

Please watch her youtube and the link. I let them tell her story.

Mary with her husband Marcus Raja. He is a Kelabit from the Bario highlands. It so happens my brother in law and sister in law are his people.

I asked Mary why she came from Penang. "I met Marcus in the University of Malaya, I felt comfortable with my Sarawakian friends. I love Sarawak."

She has her own blog: https://www.blogger.com/profile/16632369001328455773

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Nanyang Technological university now

Nanyang Technological university was constantly building. This is a  new building after we left NTU in 2006.

Nanyang Technological University early days



These Chinese structures are icons in Singapore. For a long time, Malaysians were not allowed to visit China. Coming to these Yunnan Garden served to kill two birds with one stone. They were in the university they funded, and they got a feel of China. I felt the same too, as I am 4th generations removed from China, and this is the closest I been to China.

NTU, Nanyang Technological University was originally privately raised by the Chinese people of South East Asia, including my grand parents. When I was growing up in Borneo, my grand parents and parents donated to build the Chinese University outside China. I was told that many of our Chinese ancestors owned a brick. We teased our grand dad if they gave him a number and the coordinates of his brick.

The Nanyang university of Singapore transitioned from a Chinese University to an ultra modern one funded by the Government.

When the Water Engineer went to teach in the University in 1990, it became NTI and then NTU, a fully fledged university and he became an associate professor. To date, of all the children in the Chan clan, only my daughter D attended the university.

In 1990, just before the birthday, I arrived in Singapore to live. I am thankful that I was able to live in comfort as a faculty wife. I spent sixteen of my adult years here, and the best thing is I made many friends from all over the world.

Sunday, August 6, 2017

karkalla or pig face, beach succulent




These lovely flowers cover the slopes of the sandy beach at Muriwai. They start off as a yellow flower, then turn orange and then pink. Someone told me that these beach succulents play a very important role in preventing erosion.

Carpobrotus rossii, commonly known as karkalla or pig face, is a succulent coastal groundcover plant native to southern Australia. K

http://floralfridayfoto.blogspot.co.nz/ 

Gannets

Hi Sandi,

We must have connected before, so sorry I stop, been doing some thing else. Like your dandelion tea.

Your message to Unsandi2@aol.com has been blocked.    Sorry Sandi, I don't know why my comments is blocked.

Ann

Elephants

This is Singapore Zoo. I like the humane way they treat the elephants.











A moat separated us from the performing elephants in the Singapore Zoo. Every now and then, the elephants used their nose and sprayed water at the unexpected spectators.

Some one wanted photos of elephants, I forgot who. She is welcomed to used these. Just acknowledge my source.